Dayboro Climatology Reports

Having a detailed breakdown helps everyone understand the nuances of our local weather. It’s not just about whether it was hot or cold but about understanding the patterns and preparing accordingly. And let's be honest, if you’re silly enough to have a garden like mine, knowing whether it’s going to be a scorcher or a soaker is crucial!
Dayboro Climatology Reports

Ever wondered what all those numbers in climatology reports mean? Well, you’re in the right place!

I’ve been diligently recording weather data for Dayboro since 2005, and it’s high time we broke down what each column in our NOAA-standard reports means.

Dayboro Climatology Reports

Collecting weather data for Dayboro is more than just a hobby; it’s a crucial part of understanding our local climate and its long-term patterns. With detailed records dating back to 2004 (when I moved here), we can identify trends, prepare for future weather events, and make informed decisions for agriculture, community planning, and daily life.

The data is recorded using a Davis Vantage Pro 2 weather station, ensuring accuracy and reliability. Needless to say that collecting, maintaining and expanding this is expensive.

That is why we exclusively offer our comprehensive climatology reports to subscribers to support these efforts. By subscribing, you gain access to detailed historical weather data and forecasts and contribute to this project’s sustainability.

Your subscription helps cover equipment maintenance costs, data analysis, and continuous improvements to our services. Plus, as a subscriber, you’ll be the first to receive updates and unique insights into Dayboro’s climate trends.

Are you curious to dive deeper into Dayboro’s weather patterns and support a community-focused project? Join us today! Check out our membership levels to find the plan that suits you best, and learn more about why we rely on subscriptions here.

Your support makes a difference and keeps this vital data available for all who value precise and long-term weather forecasting.

Climatology reports

These reports are only available for Dayboro Weather subscribers, if you do not see any reports below this section then that means you are either not logged in or not a member. 

Now, let’s break down the reports into understandable sections. 

Breaking Down the Columns:

  1. DAY:
    This is simply the day of the month. The Davis Vantage Pro 2 weather station timestamps all recorded data, making it easy to track and organize by date.

  2. Max Temperature (°C):
    This value represents the highest temperature recorded over 24 hours. The weather station’s thermometer measures air temperature at regular intervals, typically every 2.5 seconds, and logs the highest reading of the day.

  3. Min Temperature (°C):
    Conversely, this is the lowest temperature recorded during the day. The thermometer captures the lowest temperature within 24 hours, accurately recording daily extremes.

  4. Avg Temperature (°C):
    The average temperature is calculated by adding the daily maximum and minimum temperatures and dividing by two. This gives a simple mean temperature for the day.

  5. Diff from Normal (°C):
    This column shows the day’s average temperature deviation from historical norms. Historical average temperatures are pre-determined from long-term climate data, and the difference is calculated to indicate how unusual the day’s weather is.

  6. Avg Dew Point (°C):
    The weather station records the dew point temperature using a hygrometer, which measures the amount of moisture in the air. The average is calculated from readings taken throughout the day.

  7. Avg Wet Bulb (°C):
    The wet bulb temperature, which reflects combined temperature and humidity, is measured by a thermometer covered with a water-soaked cloth. The weather station takes multiple readings, and the average is calculated.

  8. Heating Degree Days (HDD):
    HDD is a measure used to estimate energy requirements for heating. It’s calculated by subtracting the day’s average temperature from a base temperature of 18°C. Positive values indicate heating needs.

  9. Cooling Degree Days (CDD):
    Similarly, CDD estimates cooling energy requirements. It’s calculated by subtracting 18°C from the day’s average temperature. Positive values indicate cooling needs.

  10. Significant Weather Conditions:
    Notable weather phenomena like thunderstorms, fog, or high winds are recorded manually based on observations and automatic alerts from the weather station.

  11. Sun Hours:
    The total hours of sunlight are recorded using a pyranometer, which measures solar radiation. The Davis Vantage Pro 2 logs the duration of sunlight exposure throughout the day.

  12. Max Solar Radiation (w/m²):
    This measures the peak solar energy received per square meter during the day. The pyranometer provides this data by capturing solar radiation intensity.

  13. Solar Energy (kWh):
    Total solar energy is calculated by integrating the solar radiation over time. This gives a comprehensive measure of the day’s solar energy in kilowatt-hours.

  14. Max UV:
    The highest level of ultraviolet radiation recorded during the day is measured using a UV sensor. The weather station logs the peak UV index.

  15. Snowfall (cm):
    Although rare—well beyond rare, really—snowfall is measured manually with a ruler or automatically with a snow sensor in Dayboro. The depth of snow is recorded in centimetres.

  16. Water Equivalent of Snow (mm):
    If melted, the snow’s water content is calculated by weighing a sample. This measurement is expressed in millimetres of water.

  17. Avg Sea Level Pressure (hPa):
    Atmospheric pressure at sea level is measured using a barometer. The weather station records pressure readings throughout the day and calculates the average.

  18. Avg Wind Speed (m/s):
    Wind speed is measured by an anemometer. The Davis Vantage Pro 2 records wind speeds at regular intervals, and the average speed is determined from these readings.

  19. Max Wind Speed (m/s):
    The highest wind speed recorded during the day. The anemometer captures wind gusts, and the maximum value is logged.

  20. Avg Wind Direction:
    Wind direction is measured using a wind vane. The weather station takes continuous readings, and the average direction is calculated in degrees.



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Why This Matters

Understanding these reports is crucial for grasping the complete picture of Dayboro’s climate, I figured it is important to explain what we collect and how. This post, focusing on climatology reports, is hopefully one of the few I plan to write.

We follow the NOAA standards for this report structure and data calculation to ensure our data is consistent and reliable. This format is used globally, so our data can be easily compared with other regions.

Using this standardized format ensures that our records are meticulous and comprehensive, providing a valuable resource for everyone from local gardeners to climate researchers.

The Bigger Picture

Climate data isn’t just about today’s weather; it’s about seeing long-term trends and better understanding our environment. It is important that we know that what is reported by Main Stream Media is no longer independent reporting. There is a price to be paid for not following the narrative, and most are not willing to pay that price. 

With data dating back to 2005, we can see how Dayboro’s climate is changing; there is a warming trend, not so much of CO2 but more of heat island creation and the natural climate cycles of warming and cooling. Something that has been happening since the start of this planet we call home,  understanding this helps us make informed decisions, whether planning outdoor events, farming, climate policies, or studying climate patterns.

 

Join the Discussion

For the weather aficionados, the scientifically curious, or just the plain curious, dive into our climatology reports 2005 and onwards. It’s not just a bunch of numbers – it’s a story of Dayboro’s climate!

Feel free to reach out with questions or insights. After all, the weather is a community affair here in Dayboro!

For more detailed weather data and long-term forecasts, please check our site and stay weather-wise!

(Note: If you’re wondering why the lawn looks like a 40kg scud missile hit it Rambo style – that’s another story for another blog post.)

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